Attendees 60,000+

Senior Management 68%

Speakers 1,200+

eventImage
Web Summit's logo
MEO Arena Portugal Lisbon
Location
November 5 - 8, 2018
Date range
From 992 USD
Pricing
See how this event performed in the previous years

Event details


Overview

"The largest tech conference in the world"

Web Summit & Expo is a 4 day event being held from 5th November to 8th November 2018 in Lisbon, Portugal. This event showcases product from Computer Hardware & Software, IT & Technology industries. This event showcases products like Infomation technology, business, networking, engineering, emerging technology and much more etc. in the Computer Hardware & Software, IT & Technology industries.

Web Summit started as a simple idea in 2010: Let’s connect the technology community with all industries, both old and new. It seemed to resonate. Web Summit has grown to become the “largest technology conference in the world”.

No conference has ever grown so large so fast. But we also pride ourselves in organising the “best technology conference on the planet”.

Rating

9.13 / 10
Value for money
Learnings & Insights
Business opportunities
Venue
Event organisation
user picture

Rate Web Summit Lisbon 2018

Reviews

12
user picture

Peter Mestel

Visitor

Great event and even greater side-event!

user picture Visitor

test

user picture Sponsor/Exhibitor

Its indeed a big summit. Many people come from different parts of the world. It's truly a global experience. It would take about 30 minutes to roam the entire summit, but if you finish-up that walk you would certainly know what are the current trending technologies. You consume and sometimes confuse a lot because many things go in parallel. Speaker sessions, Pitching, Investor discussions, roundtable meetings, exhibitors, networking opportunities, food trucks... huh... it's big and it's amazing. Totally, I'm loving it :)

user picture Visitor

This event is a unique opportunity were you combine network, business, the share of experiences and knowledge and last, but not the least, a lot of fun with amazing people in the same venue. As women in tech, I would love to see the compromise to gap the in inequity of gender that Web Summit stands out, at the open ceremony. See you next year!

user picture Visitor

Great one - a must in the community

user picture Visitor

user picture Sponsor/Exhibitor

Great experience, very good business opportunities and learnings. Good organization.

user picture Visitor

Absolute waste of time and money. Long lines for everything, no interaction with speakers, crowded floors, unmanageable.

user picture Visitor

It’s been great so far. It’s just a lot of people. Trying to get to everything is a bit of a challenge. But otherwise I am loving it!

user picture Visitor

user picture Visitor

user picture Visitor

Show more

Reviews from 2017

user picture Visitor

Too much of a show, too little of bysiness and good networking.

user picture Visitor

Best tech event of the year

user picture Sponsor/Exhibitor

user picture

I D

Visitor

So I just got back from my first Web Summit that took place in Lisbon last week. Before going, as a novice, I had some misconceptions as well as some expectations that turned out to be true. Sure, Web Summit is known as the biggest, greatest tech conference in Europe but there are things that it is and isn’t. It’s important to know why you’re going and what you expect to get out of it before you spend your precious time and money on immersing yourself in the all-consuming experience. Why Go? The Content: If the numerous conferences, talks and panels are what you’re after, then I have some disappointing news for you: they are shallow at best and bet on rather general discussions of global tech trends as well as celebrities than providing you with any actual know-how, knowledge or skills . They aren’t practical whatsoever and for someone who works in tech, the topics and conclusions are mostly common sense so don’t expect any Eureka! moments. Besides, the conference venue is so spread out, it literally takes you 15 minutes to walk from one end to the other. And, videos of all the talks are published throughout and shortly after the summit on the Web Summit Facebook page, for free, and you can watch them at your leisure during the post-summit months. The Expo: Some not so exciting news here too, I’m afraid. The big tech giants are all there to show off and the rest are startups that haven’t yet gained much fraction and for whom every bit of publicity helps. Plus, you can find all the exhibitors, along with their Crunchbase info and website addresses on Crunchbase and contact them, should you have enough LinkedIn InMail credits or be really good at web scraping. Practically, there’s not enough time to meet any meaningful numbers of them in 3 days and you end up distracted by stands displaying self-driving cars, talking robots, 4D printers, revolutionary coffee makers and the likes. The Connections: Bingo, this is the most valuable asset of Web Summit and the reason to go if you go at all. Despite what I said in #2 above, you can and you will meet very interesting people but most of those encounters won’t be planned. As much as you try and schedule meetings with people, you will either have something else to do, end up rescheduling endlessly or you just won’t have the time to meet all the attendees who look interesting (you can search and find their names in the Summit app). What I did was organise a tour for myself and three other conference goers before the conference started and this way we all met some pretty cool and adventurous folks while enjoying the coastal area around Lisbon. Later on, I made a connection that will be useful to me in the future while waiting in line for coffee and in a similar random fashion connected with a guy at the lunch tables, who initially offered me tips on how to eat my leaking hummus taco, then ended up talking about marketing tech. All very inspiring and completely random! The only other scheduled appointments I had were with the ladies from Imaginify as well as a cool Lisboa podcaster named Paula Cordeiro of Urbanista, both of whom interviewed me about what it’s like to be a woman in the male-dominated tech world. A missed opportunity was an interview I wanted to give to intimate, who contacted me for my opinion on the way tech has affected the sex industry. The Parties: If you’re simply going to WS to blow off some steam, who am I to judge? There are plenty of opportunities to network in a less formal setting, every night before, during and after the summit: breakfasts and brunches, sunset summit, night summit, with women only, men only, both men and women, your friends or colleagues or with friendly Lisbon locals, which of course will be hard to find in touristy joints especially during Summit week when the conference takes over the entire city. The connection opportunities are certainly plentiful, whether you’re looking to connect with new friends, new lovers or new clients/business partners: there is the official mobile app, there are meetups, events on Eventbrite, Facebook, numerous Whatsapp and Slack groups on every subject (e.g. Women in Tech, Digital Nomads, Designers, General, etc.) Some attendees also end up working at co-working spaces throughout the city so that’s another opportunity to meet them while checking out a cool new working spot. Everyone’s open to meeting up for coffee/food, networking, sightseeing, clubbing, or… pick your poison. The Weather and The City: I’ll give you that, Lisbon is gorgeous and it doesn’t matter how many times I’ve been there, I’m happy to return time and again for some more vinho verde, pasteis de nata and bacalhao. Don’t even get me started on all the cool rooftop bars, miradouros, cool cafés and hipster places. LX Factory, Bairro Alto, Largo di Carmo, Miradouro do Pilar, Jardim Botanico … don’t forget Lisbon’s surroundings: sunny Cascais, inspiring Sintra, wavy Azenhas do Mar, surfer’s paradise Peniche – the West Coast of Portugal might be windy but man, it’s beautiful! If and when Web Summit returns to Dublin, which is a rumour that’s going around, you’d have to not only offer me discounted tickets, Paddy Cosgrove, but actually pay me to be in dreary Ireland in November. Why Not to Go? Registration Lines: I am not sure why anyone in the right state of mind would wait for hours in front of the venue to register on pre-day or on the first day of the summit when just a metro away there was airport registration, accessible to anyone whether they were flying in at that time or coming in at a later time. Nevertheless, this wasn’t well communicated or emphasised enough by the summit crew and if you didn’t catch those news alerts on all the groups, you might have wasted a few hours of previous Lisbon time in lines. Next year, go to the airport and register there – it took me 5 minutes in total on pre-day and there were no lines whatsoever. Opening Night: The much hyped opening night isn’t worth going to or waiting for hours to get into the Altice arena. I suspect the whole reason it’s such a hype is because places are limited and attendance is determined by a lottery principle. If you must see the opening statements it’s best to enjoy it from the comfort of a rooftop bar or your AirBnB, where you can watch it live on Facebook. The Conference Food: It’s basically food trucks with long lines in front of them any time between 11h – 15h when the summit’s 60,000 attendees all need to graze on some chow. It’s annoying to say the least, when you have better ways of spending your time than waiting in lines. Many of them also didn’t take cards so bring enough cash to survive. Alcohol is plentiful, at least, and so are the food choices, including vegan and gluten-free options. The Bathrooms: If you’re a woman, you might as well don a pair of adult diapers, as the lines in front of the bathrooms can take up to 15 minutes before it’s your turn. On day 3 a fellow woman in tech clued me in on the existence of a ‘secret toilet’ near the general ladies’ bathrooms, which I suspect was reserved for staff and thus, not advertised. Not cool, Web Summit! As usual, no lines at the men’s and I often contemplated braving it and perusing said men’s bathrooms at the risk of being ostracised by both genders in a jiffy. The Coffee: No other way to say this but it’s shite! Sure, it’s free but it comes out of these dispenser machines and it’s as bad as it is plentiful. Luckily for all women in tech (reportedly ~40% of all attendees), Booking.com provided free drinkable (barista-made) java in the WIT lounge they sponsored. Lines for the good stuff were understandably humongous as well and some MIT (Men in Tech) were frequently spotted free-loading on the coffee paid for by the gap in women’s wages since… ehh, pretty much the beginning of tech. I didn’t mind as much until some ‘’gentleman’’ cut in line as we were about to be served Portuguese sparkling wine. The Swag: The basics were there: plastic cheapo sunglasses with zero UV protection in four different colours, pens, pencils, notepads, stress balls, stickers, t-shirts (including Web Summit-branded ones you could get in any size or logo colour), USB sticks, etc., yet nothing overly creative. The coolest gadgets I snagged were a camera privacy shutter slider thingy from a Polish company called Bitcraft, phone case rings from Cisco and a marijuana grinder from a cool startup called Budsy (only operational in the U.S. unfortunately). Someone apparently won an iWatch playing some game that I couldn’t even get around to doing, due to… you guessed right, the huge lines. More on https://inadanova.com/2017/11/14/web-summit-the-unathorized-guide/

user picture Visitor

user picture Visitor

user picture Sponsor/Exhibitor

user picture Visitor

Too broad and big. Rather go to something more specific. Nice vibe and crowd!

user picture Visitor

It was my first time and as much as I enjoyed it the mammoth size of the place and distance you had to cover to get to and from talks was truly exhausting. Think 5 football pitches worth of space plus a huge arena to give you some perspective. Many popular talks overlapped or clashed across opposing ends of the (massive) venue. If your interests were varied it was difficult get to different talks in time. In future, they should try to run several instances of certain talks so that there are more opportunities to attend. Many of the zones were not referenced in the maps which was very unhelpful (e.g. PT Meeting Centre). The volunteers weren't knowledgeable enough to locate certain areas but this is a reflection on the organisers for not preparing them enough. It was good to see a lot of inclusiveness; disabled, people of colour, women (42% attendance rate) and mothers with babies in attendance. Unfortunately, there was no thought around toilet facilities. Often the disabled toilets were locked for one lame reason or another. This was disaster obviously for the disabled, baby changing or mothers alone with a young child/baby. The baby changing facilities were badly located within women's toilets (near the door and not practical with the queues). I suggest that there are some mother and baby zones created and perhaps creche facilities on site next year. Despite my criticism it was a fantastic opportunity to learn, explore, try new tech and network on a global/international scale in ways beyond imagination.The camaraderie within the Women In Tech lounge was fantastic. Kudos to booking.com for sponsoring that section! Here are my tips: 1. Don't wear heels, high or otherwise. It has to be trainers/sneakers/sports shoes for all the walking you will be doing between stages and sections all day long! Even flat shoes will get uncomfortable after a while. Converse became my footwear of choice after a few hours in flat shoes on day 1. 2. Do take a coat that is easy to keep with you as the cloakrooms are chaotic. Who wants to queue up for ages to leave after queueing to get in?! Don't leave luggage at the venue either for the same reason. It was more practical for me and my friend to leave luggage at our accommodation and go back for it before heading to the airport on the last day. We couldn't risk missing a flight because of Web Summit delays! 3. Do allow approximately 30 mins to get into the venue because of security and the sheer numbers of attendees. 4. Do carry water. There are many water fountains throughout the venue where you can fill up through the day. 4. Do buy your lunch early, preferably late morning. The lunchtime queues are eye watering. I waited an hour on day 1 and learned my lesson! 5. Do carry plenty of business cards. You just know who you'll meet and the valuable connections you can make. 6. Do carry a powerful power bank for your phone and tablet. Everyone will be scrambling to charge their phone so available sockets will be sparse. 7. Don't forget your converter for your plug. 8. Do carry a notebook for important takeaways from talks and getting details information down when your phone battery dies. 9. Do ignore warnings not to attend opening ceremony when you have every to be there. Attendees registering at the airport were given conflicting information. I was told they were over subscribed and strongly discouraged by staff at the point of registration. I later heard that others got in who had registered after me and were guven different information. I was very annoyed and disappointed to have missed what would set the tone for the event because of poor planning decisions and no capacity considerations. Web Summit don't you understand that 80% of people would naturally want to attend the opening event? If you wanted to limit numbers be consistent in the information your staff disseminate.

user picture

lizc craig

Visitor

Bravo to all organizers - VERY ambitious programs - so many simultaneous talks. Please put the most in depth topics on Day 2. It takes 1 day to get a 'lay of the land'. Airport check = smart, easy, great idea; volunteers = fantastic. Love the Live Feeds, I did not go to Centre Stage once. Lisbon is the perfect city for Web Summit - up and coming, collaborative attitude ...very nice people.

user picture Visitor

.

user picture Visitor

user picture Visitor

user picture Visitor

user picture Visitor

Great event to get to learn trends, would like to see biotech more represented but I guess out of scope for this event? . Too many things going on at the same time and too many people but other than that, quality talks, interesting people and products.

user picture Visitor

This year it was chaotic. Rude staff. Sexism. Can't even describe everything. It was also very ableist.

user picture Visitor

poor content too much hype

user picture Visitor

Fantastic array of speakers. Very inspiring and motivational. Forefront technological innovation and networking opportunities at its finest; a no-brainer for those in the startup world. The sheer volume of people can be overwhelming at times, but easily compensated for by the welcoming Lisbon aura.

user picture Visitor

Very nice venue with lot of inspiring people on the stage. But it is too overcrowded, you have to wait for everything and in such a crowd it is not easy to find right people for your business.

user picture Visitor

Good

user picture Visitor

I love Web Summit from the venue to the speakers line up, quality content. Web Summit is for me a well oiled machine,with perfect organization, skilled team and provides a great value for money. Definitely recommend to next years goers.

user picture Visitor

Big fancy show avoiding real life challenges. Exciting as it is one has to sober up after coming back to the real world. Web summit team do not be afraid to go deeper and face issues of standard. Forget politicians, actors and all the star people that have no value. Do we cheer to see them? Yeaa..but do they give value. Nope. Waste of time. Wherever you guys are heading with this..for me has no substance with lot of sugarcoating. Viktor

user picture Visitor

It is impossible to interact, you feel like you are a sheep with a number and no body cares. You can't ask questions to the speakers, there is lines for everything, toilet, food, metro, moving from one space to another... I have a 3 days pass and I would love to sell it because I dont wanna come back after the experience of the first day.

user picture Visitor

Opening night lottery system was totally disappointing and the support was inadequate. When we ask our questions I waited too long to get a response.

Show more

Reviews from 2016

user picture Visitor

My first time attending websummit this year and to be honest it will probably be my last time. There were so many people that it felt almost impossible to find relevant people to speak to, and content was difficult to curate in a meaningful way for such a diverse audience. Having said that, there were many interesting, high profile speakers, and a great atmosphere around Lisbon.

user picture Visitor

As a developer I was expecting the talks to be similar to RISE (which is more towards the business side) but the calibre of speakers (particularly the fullstk track on day 3) just blew me away. There's something for everyone at web summit, not just marketing and business types. Also check out the parties after - it's where half my contacts came from.

user picture Visitor

First day: Opening session: Poor. Flop. People outside, wifi broken, guests missing, a PM with a very poor english, not a single translation.

user picture

Matthew Hubble

Visitor

WebSummit seemed well organized up until the opening night. Thereafter, it felt unprepared for the volume of attendees and this created an unpleasant environment. It was extremely difficult to find and network with potential connections because it created a high-stress atmosphere.

user picture Visitor

Though a 50,000+ tech conference sounds great on paper, the actual reality/experience of being in one is far different from the fantasy when the registration process, food service, facilities management, people flow management etc etc are all sub-par. This is what happens when too much time is spent on marketing & promotion and too little on logistics & operations. After this, I'm sticking to smaller, more intimate, more focused conferences. Less is definitely more.

user picture Visitor

Way to many people. Long lines for getting in, eating, and going to the toilet. Missing really good speakers when waiting in lines for everything. This is not ok...

user picture Visitor

Second day. 9.18 pm. Over 1km of lines outside. First attendees were still waiting to get in at 9.05. Most will miss initial speakers (the reason I paid to come). Fortunately Portuguese are polite. In any other city you would have a riot. Organisation seems incapable to handle big crowds. Sad.

user picture Visitor

Interessanting parallel events, too expensive tickets. Great melting pot.

user picture Visitor

Interessanting parallel events, too expensive tickets. Great melting pot.

user picture Sponsor/Exhibitor

Nowhere near as focused as it used to be.....risk of losing momentum and interest...far too diluted, anything and everything goes.

user picture Sponsor/Exhibitor

user picture Sponsor/Exhibitor

user picture Sponsor/Exhibitor

user picture Sponsor/Exhibitor

not worth. thanks

user picture

Fares Hadj Ali

Sponsor/Exhibitor

user picture Sponsor/Exhibitor

user picture

Eugene Shevchenko

Sponsor/Exhibitor

user picture

Thomas Cort Hansen

Sponsor/Exhibitor

Really great event for meeting fellow entrepreneurs, while exploring new trends in IT and not least meeting interesting people and expanding network

user picture Sponsor/Exhibitor

user picture Sponsor/Exhibitor

This event was very unorganized and seriously oversold with attendees. The one entrance was a hot mess and this event was so overbooked that the sessions were standing room only and packed where you were rubbing up against the person next to you. Serious planning flaws! I know it was their first year in Lisbon so hopefully they will get this all sorted out in the future. Also after numerous issues that was raised to Paddy, the founder of the event, he made it clear to me that he thought the United States was a joke (In writing!). Unprofessional and surprising that someone of his stature would make statements about a country that is probably more than half of his revenue.

Show more

Speakers 40

#

Evan Williams

  • Medium/Twitter
  • Founder
#

Margrethe Vestager

  • European Commission
  • European Commissioner for Competition
#

John Collison

  • President - Stripe
  • Co-Founder
#

Gillian Tans

  • Booking.com
  • CEO
#

Zhang Yanqi

  • Ofo
  • Co-Founder
#

Maisie Williams

  • Actress
#

Shahrzad Rafati

  • Broadband TV
  • Founder & CEO
#

Young Sohn

  • Samsung
  • President
#

Mandy Ginsberg

  • Match Group
  • CEO
#

Alexis Ohanian

  • Initialized & Reddit
  • Co-Founder
#

Cyan Banister

  • Founders Fund
  • Partner
#

Peter Diamandis

  • Singularity University
  • CEO & Chairman
#

Devin WenigCEO & President

  • eBay
  • CEO & President
#

Stephanie McMahon

  • WWE
  • Chief Brand Officer
#

Peggy Hicks

  • UN High Commission on Human Rights
  • Director
#

Joseph Lubin

  • ConsenSys
  • Co-Founder of Ethereum
#

Emmett Shear

  • Twitch
  • Founder & CEO
#

Tim Draper

  • Draper Associates
  • Founder
#

Carlos Moedas

  • European Commision
  • European Commissioner for Research, Science and Innovation
#

Xabi Uribe-Etxebarria

  • Sherpa
  • Founder & CEO
#

Matt Brittin

  • Google
  • President, EMEA Business & Operations
#

Mark Schneider

  • Nestle
  • CEO
#

Gail Heimann

  • Weber Shandwick
  • President
#

Nicole Eagan

  • Darktrace
  • CEO
#

Dick Costolo

  • Chorus
  • CEO
#

Samantha Barry

  • Glamour
  • Editor in Chief
#

Daniel Grieder

  • Tommy Hilfiger
  • CEO
#

Terrell McSweeny

  • US Federal Trade Commission
  • Commissioner
#

Peter Baumgartner

  • Etihad
  • CEO
#

Susan Credle

  • FCB Global
  • Chief Creative Officer
#

Deirdre McGlashan

  • MediaCom
  • Global Chief Digital Officer
#

Garry Kasparov

  • Avast
  • Chess Grandmaster & Security Ambassdor
#

Oliver Bate

  • Allianz
  • CEO
#

Joe Sugg

  • YouTube star
#

Window Snyder

  • Fastly
  • CSO
#

Hikmet Ersek

  • Western Union
  • CEO
#

Trae Vassallo

  • Defy Partners
  • Co-Founder & General Partner
#

Mounir Mahjoubi

  • Government of France
  • Secretary of State for Digital Affairs
#

David Pemsel

  • The Guardian Media Group
  • CEO
#

Evan Williams

  • Medium/Twitter
  • Founder

Media

Organiser

Web Summit

Global conference organisers. Go to event website »